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Navy’s in a Cast

I got a call from the school day. Navy fell at the skating rink and is complaining that his arm hurts.

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He would be in the nurse’s office with an ice pack and could I please come get him to have his arm checked out.

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Lily’s LuLaRoe Leggings Heaven

One of the issues we deal with constantly is Lily’s tactile sensitivity. Some materials bother her. The cuts of some of her clothes, particularly pants, agitate her. Add to that, she is now in a walking boot.

Jeans don’t fit over her boot. Jeans don’t feel comfortable in her boot. She’s been wearing leggings as much as possible.

Thankfully, awesome LuLaRoe fashion consultant, Jennifer Langford, came to our rescue. She hooked Lily up with several pairs of the company’s buttery soft leggings.

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We also came home with two kid’s Azure skirts, two Gracie shirts, and an Adeline dress. I’m hoping that with the LuLaRoe leggings that Lily already has, this will making having to wear a walking boot less annoying for her.

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Jennifer is a LuLaRoe fashion retailer in New Haven, Indiana. She started her business in 2016. “I am happy to help you find the most comfortable, fun, and flattering clothes to make you feel fantastic.”

LuLaRoe Jennifer Langford

No Surgery!

We met with Dr. Wilhite from Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital. He evaluated the MRI results and examined Lily’s ankle.

He was pretty confident, looking at the grow plates in her ankle, that she will be able to avoid surgery!

The catch? She has to wear a walking boot for 6 weeks. She also is considered non-weight bearing and will be crutches or a walker.

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Lily will not be able to participate in gym or Girls on the Run until further notice. Learning the ins-and-outs of not being able to walk on her left foot will be an experience for all of us.

She will go back to see Dr. Wilhite at the end of April to have her ankle x-rayed and move forward with this process.

MRI Results

The MRI results are in!

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Lily’s ankle has an osteochondral defect (OCD) that is approximately 1 centimeter wide. It is almost half of the width of her ankle bone (talus).

Talking with her orthopedist, he feels that she would be better served by a pediatric orthopedic surgeon. Unfortunately, we don’t happen to have one in our area. She has been referred to a surgeon from Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital in Indianapolis.

Hoping that we are able to get an appointment with this new ortho Doctor in a few weeks to get this ankle of hers fix!

Hoping

Lily’s 1st MRI

Lily had the MRI done on her ankle today. There’s no spot in the baby book for this!

How do you explain what’s going to happen during an MRI to a 9-year-old?!

I found a really cool explanation online that said that magnets in this tube would make the water in her body all spin in the same direction to give a really good picture of her ankle. The cool part? She wouldn’t be able to feel it! Lily really seemed to like that.

The bad part? The machine would be super loud, and she’d have to wear headphones.

The hardest part for Lily was staying still. Her ADHD kicked in. She kept wanting to play with her silk blanket and move her hands. The tech only had to retake one of the pictures.

We have a follow-up with the orthopedist next week, so we’ll have the results and develop a treatment plan then. The wait sucks!

Even the Best Plans…

I had some really exciting plans for our blog, but those got put on hold with a recent trip to our pediatrician.

Lily has been having some pain in her ankle. Not enough for me to suspect something serious. She could run and play normally, the pain wasn’t severe and usually only after inactivity.

He ordered x-rays, just to be on the safe side. When he called the next day, he admitted his own shock in finding out that Lily had Osteochondritis dissecans.

Osteochondritis dissecans (os-tee-o-kon-DRY-tis DIS-uh-kanz) is a joint condition in which bone underneath the cartilage of a joint dies due to lack of blood flow. This bone and cartilage can then break loose, causing pain and possibly hinder joint motion. (Mayo Clinic.)

We were referred to an orthopedist who specialized in the foot and ankle. I was able to pick the same doctor that Navy saw when he broke his foot.

Next up, an MRI…

(Photos by Navy.)

National Stalking Awareness Month

January is National Stalking Awareness Month.

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According to a 2014 CDC study, 7.5 million people are stalked each year in the United States. Fifteen percent of women and 6% of men will experience stalking in their lifetime (Breiding, 2014).

Seventy-six percent of women killed by an intimate partner had been stalked prior to their murders. Fifty-four percent of those women had reported their stalking to police (McFarlane, 1999).

Victims of stalking tend suffer more from anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction, and severe depression when compared to the general population. The victims had more symptoms of psychopathology when the stalking was more severe, according to a study conducted in the Netherlands (Blaauw, 2002).

I’ve barely scratched the surface on this topic. I haven’t even tried to look into information related to social media.

Stalking: Know it. Name it. Stop it.

Eric Blaauw, et al., “The Toll of Stalking: The Relationship Between Features of Stalking and Psychopathology of Victims,” Journal on Interpersonal Violence, 17, No. 1 (2002): 50-63.

Matthew J. Breiding, et al., “Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization – National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011”, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Morality Weekly Report, Vol. 63, No. 8 (2014).

Judith McFarlane, et al., “Stalking and Intimate Partner Femicide,” Homicide Studies 3, No. 4 (1999).